×

Warning

JUser: :_load: Unable to load user with ID: 42

Prime Minister Balkenende responded to concerns expressed by the Prime Minister of Japan that, "as to whaling, I explained the Dutch government is working on a change in the law that would make it possible to take adequate measures against Dutch ships that commit unlawful acts."

The truth is that the crew of the Steve Irwin has not committed any unlawful acts. The Dutch government has not cited the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society or the Captain and crew of the Steve Irwin with any violations. The governments of Japan and Australia have not charged Sea Shepherd with any violations.

“This is all political and it is not proper for the Prime Minister of the Netherlands to be threatening to pass legislation to remove the Dutch flag from a vessel that has not been charged with any wrong doing,” said Captain Paul Watson, Sea Shepherd Founder and President. “The Prime Minister should be more concerned about protecting the safety of Dutch citizens than he seems to be about protecting the interests of the Japanese whale poachers.”

The Sea Shepherd whale defense campaign this year is called Operation Waltzing Matilda and will be the sixth expedition to intervene against illegal Japanese whaling. During these encounters, the Japanese whalers have used acoustical weapons, concussion grenades, and have even shot at Sea Shepherd crew. One bullet struck Captain Paul Watson in the chest and was stopped by his Kevlar vest.

“I think that the Prime Minister should be more concerned about Japanese violence than about our non-violent measures to stop illegal whaling,” said De Groot.
---------------------------------

Article found here: <http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5ix4Fr_jxOiUeGxT0zGM_myGF75RQ>

Japan urges Netherlands to help against whaling activists
(AFP) – 7 hours ago

TOKYO — Japan on Monday urged the Netherlands to take action against the Dutch-registered flagship of the Sea Shepherd environmentalist group over its attacks on Japanese whalers in the Antarctic.

Japanese Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama said he made the request when he met his Dutch counterpart Jan Peter Balkenende, now on his four-day visit to the country.

"I asked as a flag state to handle the obstruction of maritime safety," Hatoyama told reporters at a joint news conference with Balkenende.

The Dutch premier replied: "As to whaling, I explained the Dutch government is working on a change in the law that would make it possible to take adequate measures against Dutch ships that commit unlawful acts."

He added: "We disagree about whaling... but we do not disagree on the importance of safety at sea."

The Sea Shepherd Conservation Society has repeatedly harassed Japanese whaling vessels as the group's ship rammed into Japanese whalers in Antarctic waters and its crew threw bottles filled with chemicals.

Japan hunts whales by using a loophole in the 1986 moratorium on commercial whaling that allows whales to be killed for "lethal research," and Tokyo often accuses western critics of insensitivity toward its culture.

 

Pin It
Facebook
Twitter
YouTube
Donate
Shop